The Psychedelic Wonders Of Persian Architecture From 5 Cities In Iran


Medieval Iran has witnessed the emergence of some of the most beautiful wonders of Islamic art and architecture. These wonders mostly emerged during the Safavid dynasty, when Isfahan was the capital city of Persia. The Persian architecture from the 1500s to the 1800s, known as the early modern period, featured quite distinct architectural elements like the pointed arches, the sculptural stalactites, known as ‘Muqarnas’, and the bulbous domes with floral decorations. The polychrome tiles of blue, gold, turquoise, and white cover the interiors of mosques and palaces, in the form of complicated floral and geometric patterns as well as the Arabic calligraphy quoting verses from the Quran.

The marvellous architecture that arose in the time remains up to this day a sight to behold.


Persian architecture emerged in the period between 550 BC and 330 BC, which means it is about 2750 years old, these examples are from just five cities in Iran.


Golestan Palace means the palace of flowers, and it was the royal residence for the Qajar dynasty which ruled Persia during the 19th century.

Grand Mosque of Isfahan or the Jamee’ Mosque of Isfahan is the congregational mosque of Iran’s former capital city

Shah Mosque, also known as Imam Mosque, is a relic of Safavid architecture that lies on the southern side of Isfahan’s central square Naghsh-e Jahan.

Alexander’s Prison is a school that dates back to the 15th century. It got this name because of the references in a poem by Hafez, the famous Persian poet. However, there is no evidence that the school was formerly Alexander’s dungeons.

Jame Mosque of Yazd is an Azeri-styled grand congregational mosque of the historical city. Its construction was probably completed during the 14th century.

Shah Cheragh is a mosque that houses the tombs of the sons of the seventh Imam, one of the 12 Imams of the Shia Muslims who mainly reside in Persia. It is also famous for its dazzlingly glittery interior.